How to Assess Your Product Management Life Cycle

     

16 Questions to ask in orAssess.pngder to conduct your Product Life Cycle

We at Spice Catalyst have identified 6 key and SPICEY things a company must have in order to ensure they will have successful products.  

One of them is to have a well-defined product management lifecycle process.

That’s nice, but how do you know if the one you got is working and/or can be improved?

Over the years I have developed 16 questions you can ask in order to conduct your own assessment.

They cover all the interpersonal and interorganizational behavior questions that are key to understanding what is working well, what is not and what your team should suggest be done about it. It also covers asking about the inputs that help your team get the job done and what competencies they need to actually do their job.  The questions will also help you get a feel for how well your team understands your company’s culture and whether or not the culture is enhancing success — or encouraging failure.

Product Management Life Cycle Assessment Yourself

You can use these questions to do interviews throughout the company yourself or…hire a 

Product Management Life Cycle Assessment Consultant

Or, you could hire a McKinsey-like consultancy and have one of their newly-minted MBAs come out and interview everybody, give no one in your organization credit for their time or views, then charge you really big bucks.  I know, I had that done to me when I was at Apple and Dataquest.

Or, find someone that knows how to listen, observe, and pull together the findings in a compelling report/presentation that can truly make a difference…hmmm, all the good qualities of a great product manager.

Click on this link to: Get your FREE Product Life Cycle Assessment Questions 

About The Author

David Fradin has trained thousands of managers throughout the world. He infuses his workshops with insights and experiences gained as a expert product leader, product manager and product marketing manager at companies like Apple and HP. He was classically trained as an HP Product Manager and was then recruited by Apple to bring the first hard disk drive on a PC to market. As a result of his leadership and management skills, Apple promoted him first to Apple /// Group Product Manager and later Business Unit Manager at the same organizational level at that time as Steve Jobs. His forthcoming book “Building Insanely Great Products” and these workshops covers the founding values, vision, product life cycle and management employed by Apple at its founding and which it returned to in 1997 when Steve Jobs returned to Apple. What students will learn in these workshops is exactly what has made Apple the most valuable company in the world.